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Long Island Produce Company Building in Southold,
Located on Youngs Avenue, 1930s, No longer extant

~ HOUSES 2000 ~
(Updated 11/2012)

Over a decade ago the Society began an ambitious project to document the history of many houses and buildings within Southold and Peconic Hamlets.  This information has been sitting in our archives and we have decided to now make it available to a wider audience on-line.  Over the next several months we will be adding histories and images of the buildings that were included as part of this project, as well as adding others that were overlooked, and still others that are no longer standing.  Check back soon to learn more about the many historic buildings in Southold Town!

~  ~  ~  ~

HISTORIC BUILDINGS - COMMERCIAL - SOUTHOLD

Name:  Horton Point Lighthouse
Tax ID Number:  50-1-11
Street Address: Lighthouse Road
Hamlet:  Southold
Built:  1857
Status:  Extant

Although the Horton Point Lighthouse was commissioned in 1790 during George Washington’s Presidency, the first letter requesting a fixed light at Horton Point came in 1853 from William Brown, Master of the steamer Bay State. In 1854, the Light-House Board received 2 petitions, from Connecticut Congressman Nathan Belcher and L. E. Daboll of New London Connecticut. On August 3, 1854, Congress appropriated $4,000 for the construction of the lighthouse, which was deemed inadequate by the Light-House Board. Another $3,500 was appropriated on August 18, 1856.  William Sinclair, a Scottish immigrant who obtained US citizenship in 1823, oversaw and documented the construction, beginning on May 19, 1857. Sinclair was well suited to the job as he was formerly an engineer in Brooklyn Navy Yard. His first entry is noting the arrival of the first delivery of bricks, 90,000 in all, on May 16, 1857.  On June 9, 1857 the cornerstone was laid in the cellar. A second shipment of bricks, 60,000 in number, arrived on June 23, 1857 from the contractor, E. N. Huble, to be used for the tower. On July 7, the first brick was laid on the dwelling. On September 25, the masons finished work on both the tower and dwelling and on October 5, the Third Order Fresnel lantern was raised into place All work was completed by October 12, 1857 and the light was first lit on October 15, 1857. The total cost of the construction was $12,412, itemized as follows: $3,875 for labor, $6,437 for materials, and $2,100 for lens and apparatus.  The Depression, the availability of electric, and the absorption of the US Lighthouse Service of the US Commerce Department into the US Coast Guard all led to the automation of lighthouses in the 1930’s. In 1933 a 50 foot high skeletal metal tower was erected 50 feet north of the tower, and on June 30, 1933 a revolving green electric light was lit.  The Southold Park District acquired the property from the Department of Commerce for $1. Keeper Ehrhardt continued to live in the dwelling and commuted to the Shinnecock Lighthouse, from which he retired in 1935.  During years of non-use, the iron balcony was removed for scrap, the ten bronze drain gargoyles disappeared, and the wood porch was removed. In 1970-71, the Southold Historical Society urged the Southold Park Commission to do some work so that the keeper’s dwelling could be occupied by the society’s curator/director. For five years nothing happened as money was scarce. Finally, as a 1976 bicentennial project, a $40,000 restoration effort addressed wiring, heating and plumbing. It was also at this time that the first Nautical Museum was established at the lighthouse through the efforts of George Wagoner, the Society's director.  The new museum opened in July of 1977. The Daily News reported that "Most of the museum's exhibits are of marine and nautical objects, paintings and documents." Of special interest was the first exhibition of the Horton Point Lighthouse log books dating from 1890-1918. In addition, Newsday noted in a feature article that a number of important objects had joined the museum's displays: "The new museum is currently exhibiting multi-colored scrimshaw, a lapdesk made on board a whaling ship by Capt. Francis Sayre of Southold, and his sextant and a spyglass made by Ben Fitz . . ." In 1978 the museum hosted a special one-man exhibition of marine paintings by noted nautical artist Len J. Pearce (b. 1932).  A studio apartment for rental was created on the second floor, and public restrooms for the Park were built. In early 1988, the Park District and the Historical Society volunteers Cliff and Eunice Benfield, Don and Doris Bayles, and Bob Pettit planned and effected the restoration of the tower and lantern room. The tower was re-commissioned by the Coast Guard on June 9, 1990, and the light was again lit after many decades of silence.  In a 1993 agreement between the Historical Society and the Park District, the Nautical Museum retains perpetual occupancy as long as it maintains its exhibition function for the tower and museum space. The US Coast Guard maintains the operation of the light and the Park District maintains the grounds, restrooms and apartment. The Historical Society and the Park District share in cooperative maintenance and restoration activities. In 2006 the entire interior of the Nautical Museum portion of the lighthouse was revamped with new historical objects and documents, labels, and displays.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 52-4-2.2
Address: 64755 Main Road
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status:  Extant

Larry Tuminello was an owner of this commercial property. In 2000 the building became a realty.

Name:  Reichert Family Center (AKA Sherburne Beckwith Store)
Tax ID Number:  61-2-7.2
Address:  54127 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  c. 1840s
Status:  Extant

The Reichert Family Center and Cosden Price Gallery was known locally as the Beckwith store. It is located on the north side of State Route 25 in the hamlet of Southold, Suffolk County, New York. Located on property once owned by early 17th century Southold settlers John Conklynge, Richard Cark, and John Salmon, the building was built by the Lester family before 1850. The Hon. Thomas S. Lester Sr. (1782-1817) was a prominent local resident and states attorney whose son, Col. Thomas S. Lester Jr. (1811-1885), amassed a fortune and donated the first clock for the steeple of the Southold Presbyterian Church.  The store building was sold by Thomas S. Lester, Senior’s widow, Mary H. A. Lester, to G. P. Horton in 1858 along with eight acres of land. George P. Horton was a master builder in Southold during the mid-19th century and was responsible for many important structures, including his own mansion which was later known as the Albertson House, located on the corner of Youngs Avenue and Route 25.  In April of 1864, the building and four acres, were acquired by Capt. Sherburne Beckwith (1822-1896), who hired local carpenter William H. Corwin in 1867 to build his new home just west of the store building. Beckwith came to Southold from Connecticut in 1849 to run a ship chandlery in Greenport, located east of Southold. He retired to Southold in the 1860s where he ran a small dry goods business from his store building. His descendants would own the building until 1984.  Following Beckwith’s death, the store was leased to and occupied by Frank T. Wells, who ran his own dry goods enterprise from the building in the early 20th century. The building was leased by Arthur F. Gagen for his insurance business in later years. During the mid-20th century, part of the shop was subdivided into two spaces, with Capt. Beckwith’s grandson, Joseph Beckwith Hartranft (1890-1982), using his portion as painting studio and gallery. Hartranft was a very successful local painter, continuing a tradition that began with the arrival of many other artists during the 19th century.
Following his death in 1982, the building and neighboring Beckwith house were sold separately, the store being acquired by Robert W. Gillispie, III. Gillispie ran his “North Fork Real Estate” business from the shop for almost thirty years until his own death in 2009. He was a life member of the Southold Historical Society, and it was from his estate that the Society purchased the building in 2011.

Name:  Henry W. Prince Building (AKA: The Brick Store)
Tax ID Number:  61-2-10.3
Address:  54325 (54255) Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  1874
Status:  Extant

The Prince Building was built in 1874 for Henry Wells Prince (1839-1925) and G. Frank Hommel.  Hommel occupied the west side of the building where he ran a shoe store and Prince occupied the east where he ran a successful dry goods business. The building was twice home to the United States Post Office - first in 1893 and again from 1932 through the 1950s.  The building contains approximately 29,475 bricks manufactured by the Brenan and Graham brick companies. Construction began October 26, 1874 and was concluded on or about February 2, 1875. Those who helped construct the building included Thomas Quarty, D. Glover, and S. A. Prince (Carpenters); T. Donahue, Harrison Reeve, John Whitney, T. Topping, J. Cogan, Joe Sidor, O. Corwin, and a Horton and a Terry (Masons and Laborers).  By the late 19th century Prince had bought out Mr. Hommel and taken over the entire establishment for his business activities. The basement, at that time, housed a popular Oyster Bar and candy store, which was entered through a door cut into the basement on the front of the building. In February of 1881 the Southold Grange voted to accept the offer of space on the second floor of the building. The International Order of Odd Fellows also used this space. In June of 1890 a large opening was cut through the center wall dividing the two rooms on the second floor.  The building housed a number of stores following Prince and Hommel, and the second floor was converted into apartments after 1940. Though the correct order and time spans are not known, these businesses included: W. A. Williams Clothing Store; Fred Fickeissen's Grocery Store; Chris Grattan's Butcher Shop; Rothman's Department Store; Smitty's Fruit & Vegetable Storerooms; Jimmy's Restaurant (1950s); a Television and Radio Store; Lambert's Clothing Store; and Gossner's (printing/stationary).  The building was badly damaged in August of 1954 during hurricane Carol when the east side roof and upper portion of the front wall gave way (see below). The original round attic story window was never restored, and instead a demi-lune window was placed in that position. At that time, the U.S. Post Office occupied the west side and a restaurant occupied the east side.  By 1989 the building was in a bit of disrepair, the remaining portion of the original porch having been removed after 1954. The Society purchased the building that year from Arthur and Millicent Gossner and began an aggressive restoration and rehabilitation effort. Today, the building is fully restored and houses the Maureen Ostermann Administrative Center, Archives, Museum Gift Shop, and the Treasure Exchange Consignment Shop.

Name:  Cleveland-Glover-Gagen Blacksmith Shop
Tax ID Number:  62-2-5.2
Address:  55200 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date: 1845
Status:  Extant

Currently located on the grounds of the Southold Historical Society.

Name:  Southold Yacht Club (First Building)
Tax ID Number:  81-1-24.3 
Address:  End of Robinson Road at Paradise Point
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  1948
Status:  No longer extant

The Southold Yacht Club was organized in March of 1938 to serve the growing community of professional and amateur yachtsmen. For many years, the club used the town pier at Founder's Landing and other locations, including Indian Neck, from where they hosted many of their annual events. From 1938 through 1947 the club examined thirteen different sites for a permanent club house, finally settling on property at the tip of Paradise Point in August of 1947. Construction of the building began in early 1948, and may have included portions of at least two old barrack structures from Camp Upton, which were brought by barge to the site (this has not been confirmed). The new clubhouse was dedicated and opened for business on July 4th, 1948, with over 400 people in attendance. The building was open during the early 1950s, from Tuesday thru Sunday, including evenings, and served "...sandwiches, salads, hamburgers, and the proverbial hot-dogs at fair prices." Increasingly dangerous currents eventually made the site of the clubhouse too dangerous to use for sailing purposes. The club moved to their new site, near the Goose Creek Bridge around 1969. That year, they purchased a portion of the dock from the Silver Sands Motel to install at the new site. The old clubhouse building was sold to be converted into a private home and was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012.
 

HISTORIC BUILDINGS - COMMERCIAL - CUTCHOGUE

Name:  Cutchogue-New Suffolk Free Library (AKA Ind. Congregational Church)
Tax ID Number:  109-6-2.2
Address:  51225 Route 25
Hamlet:  Cutchogue
Date:  1862
Status:  Extant

The Cutchogue-New Suffolk Free Library was built as a church by the Independent Congregational Church and Society in 1862. The society was formed by a group of people who split off from the Cutchogue Presbyterian Church. They built their church on land donated by one of their members and financed through member contributions such as a wooded lot, 4 shares of stock and one woman’s gold beads.  By 1913 the building was not in use and the members had returned to the Presbyterian Church while still keeping their religious society active. The Trustees voted to refurbish the building and grounds for use as a library. In 1914 the Trustees approved the rental of the building for a dollar a year. The library was opened and staffed by volunteers and then granted a charter in 1917. A furnace and electricity were installed in 1920. In 1927 the Cutchogue Methodist Church burned and the Congregational Society closed the library to allow the Methodists to use the building for worship while they were building their new church. The library was reopened when the new Methodist church was completed. The library continued to operate in the Church building for a nominal rent with free standing shelving and no permanent furnishings so that it could be returned to a place of worship with little problem.  Today (2012) the building is only a library, and is no longer used for worship purposes.
 

HISTORIC BUILDINGS - RESIDENTIAL - SOUTHOLD

Name:  William Russell House
Tax ID Number:  50-2-7
Street Address: 605 Soundview Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:  1800s
Status: Extant

According to the most recent owner, the house was built in the 1800s. The original structure is of wood over which at some later date brick walls were erected. There is a rather large cistern located in the cellar.  It is circular and built of bricks stuccoed inside. Rain water was collected from which it was hand pumped into the attic and was dispensed by gravity.  Chimney and foundation are constructed from beach-stones. It had a “secret” compartment in the attic which contained an old metal cot, ammunition, a gun powder bottle and part of a still together with some old bottles. There is a beautiful stained glass window mounted between two interior rooms.  It is signed “James Baker, NY 1879.”  The old kitchen has been modernized with 150-year-old white pine from a tobacco shed.  The garage/workshop was converted into two bedroom guest house (no kitchen).  Chimney has a shape of the letter “S.”  The home was first owned either by a man named William Russell (b. 1825), a preacher, or his son, William F. Russell (b. 1855).  Later it was owned, c. 1909, by Simon Fillmore Peavy (b.1884), who was John D. Rockefeller’s lawyer.  Thereafter a man named Applegate owned it.  During the 1960s-70s it was owned by John O’Connor, TV critic of the New York Times.  It was purchased by Stanley J. Ciaputa, the present (2012) owner in the 1970s.

Name:  Alfred H. Cosden Stable (AKA:  'Eastward' Stable)
Tax ID Number:  51-3-2.10
Address:  1750 Mount Beulah Avenue
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  Completed by 1916
Status:  Extant

Alfred H. Cosden was a wealthy pharmaceutical executive, originally from Delaware. He and fellow friends Edward Cahoon and Joseph Marshall built large estates here in Southold.  The architect hired to design the estate was James L. Burley, a well respected New York City architect, and designer of Cahoon’s nearby mansion, “Over-the-Sound-Villa.”  In addition to being a successful businessman, Cosden was a famous horse breeder and racer and his stable won many important competitions, including the Belmont Stakes in 1928. That year his racer “Vito,” beat out other horses to claim the top prize on Long Island. Between 1905 and 1935 Cosden owned dozens of horses and won an equal amount of competitions and prizes up and down the East Coast. In 1916 the large house and estate - christened 'Eastward' - were completed and that summer the Cosden family moved into their new home. Unlike many such houses, this one was not a vacation house. It was to be the year-round residence of the family.  The Cosden estate was large by any standard. It was composed of more than forty acres of woodlands, pasture, and gardens. The house sat opposite a specially designed golf course that was established by Cosden. The mansion lot was four acres, overlooking the bluffs and Long Island Sound and from the house there was an elaborate ninety-eight step staircase down to the private beach below. The grounds were designed to be comfortable and to encourage visitors to stroll and examine the magnificent variety of trees, shrubs, and flowering plants.  Across from the main house on Mount Beulah Avenue were a number of the service buildings. First, there was the complex that contained the stable, garage, pump house, and barn, which was designed to house horses, to provide an area for milking the cows, and to provide a place to protect the family’s vehicles. Behind this complex was the large tractor shed that stored the equipment used to maintain the grounds.  South of the complex were two houses, the Superintendent’s Residence and the Gardener’s Cottage. A pair of Georgian Revival brick structures, the northerly one served as the residence of William V. Cosden, Alfred’s brother and superintendent of his estate. In the southerly located one, the gardener and other servants were housed.  The estate itself was sold and the mansion demolished in 1940. Today several of the outbuildings survive as private homes while the surviving ornate iron fences and gate posts mark portions of the estate.  The Stable passed into the ownership of Clement Booth and later to Herbert Ernest, who renovated it into a summer home.  It was sold c. 2010 to a new owner.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 51-3-3.17
Address: Burgundy Court
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Steven Sprengel was an owner. Nancy Palahnuk was the owner in 2000.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 51.3-9.1
Address: 49975 North Road
Hamlet: Southold
Date: Before 1860
Status: Extant

Grace and Laura Ann Prince were the owners in 1860. John Thompson was the owner in 1861. Cacola Salvator was the owner in 1999. Antonins and Elizabeth Elenis were the owners in 2000.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 52-2-2.5
Address: Ruch Lane
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Margaret Rose was an executor. Ann Clements was the owner in 2000.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 52-5-3.2
Address: 25 Bayview Avenue Extension (on Hashamomack Pond)
Hamlet: Southold
Date: c. 1950
Status: Extant

Peter and Rita Byrne were the owners from 1970 to 2001. Helen & Philip Didriksen became the owner in 2001.  The house was apparently originally a one-story cottage. The Byrnes put on the second story, making it one big room. The Byrnes also filled in the site yard which had been a swamp.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 52-5-5.5
Address: Albertson Lane
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Horace P. Tillinghast was the owner in 2000.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 54-2-3
Address: 13725 Sound Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Robert Lerner was an owner. William Woodall became the owner in 2000.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 54-9-5
Address: 245 Hickory Road
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Zoumas Contracting was an owner. Andrew Wineberger became the owner in 2000.

Name: Albert J. and Mary Prince Tillinghast House
Tax ID Number: 55-01-03.2
Address: Old North Road
Hamlet: Southold
Date: Before 1833
Status: Extant

Albert and Mary (Prince) Tillinghast were the owners in 1833.  Mary (Prince) Tillinghast was born in 1814 and died in 1880. She was a descendant of Capt. John Prince. This house on Old North Road with its commanding view directly down Youngs Avenue was probably built by Albert and Mary Tillinghast about the time of their marriage. Though quite overgrown and neglected in 1970, its former bustling farm activities were apparent by the many and varied buildings behind the house. A grindstone acted as a doorstop at the side door and sidelights at the front door whet one’s curiosity enough to peek within. The simple lines and charm of the house with its rambling additions were somehow enhanced by a fear for its future.

Name: Prince/Grigonis House
Tax ID Number: 55-2-1.4
Address: Youngs Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:  Before 1839
Status: Extant

Thomas E. and Mehitable S. Prince were the owners from 1839 to 1864. Antone Grigonis became the owner in 2000.  This two-room house had a mostly stone cellar with a high brick cistern from the dirt floor to the ceiling which was possibly used to collect rain water.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 55-2-3
Address: 5720 Youngs Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:  Before 1860
Status: Extant

Albert Salmon was the owner from 1860 to 1923. Albert (Bill) and Helen Salmon became the owners in 1921.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 55-2-8.5
Address: 44002 Old North Road (Youngs Avenue)
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Owners included Thomas Edward Prince and Antone Grigonis.

Name: William and Mary Prince House
Tax ID Number: 55-2-15
Address: 4000 Youngs Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:  Before 1855
Status: Extant

William and Mary Prince were the owners in 1855. John and Janet Harris became the owners in 2000.

Name: Wedgwood Shop (Presently 1670 Furniture House store)
Tax ID Number: 55-2-23
Address: 47025 North Road
Hamlet: Southold
Date:  Before 1853, possibly 18th c.
Moved: 1960
Status:  Extant

Michael Kenny was the owner in 1853. Mrs. James Tait was the owner in 1960. The Kaller Family were owners for awhile. As taken from the Southold Historical Society Guide to Historic Markers: “Who was the first owner of this attractive little “Half Cape Cod” with its hand-hewn timbers, its “borning room” and random width floors? Unanswerable because of baffling questions in research and conflicting data. It would seem to be a twice, or possibly thrice, moved house, and it mayhap it will be found to be another “much-moved” house. In middle 19th century Michael Kenny and his wife Mary Cassidy who were married 1853 lived in it and brought up their children, John, Rose, Mary, Kate, James, Michael. For over 100 years it was in Kenny ownership, during the time it stood on a previous North Road site where now Kaelin’s Farm Equipment in located. The initials “J. H.” are carved on a hand-hewn rafter. Strange enough, they could stand for both the Joshua Horton and the Jonah Horton Halsey, a century apart, who are in question. An early Wells, Phillips. Harvey, Glover, Corwin, Hallock, another Horton and Barnabas H. Booth, as well as others, have appeared at various points in the research work. Before the answer comes forth with the first owner established, several other houses involved with this one have to be identified.”

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 55-3-8
Address: 48000 North Road
Hamlet: Southold
date:
Status: Extant

Linda J. Wheeler was an owner. In 2000 Jeannette Prostowich became the owner.

Name: The Robert-Mirchel House
Tax ID Number: 55-4-16
Address: 2485 Yennecott Drive
Hamlet:  Southold
Date: 1974
Status:  Extant

Mr. & Mrs. Roberts were the owners in 1974. Dr. and Mrs. F. H. Mirchel became the owners in 1986.  This three bedroom, two bath house features a den, living/dining area plus an enclosed porch off the living room. The kitchen appliances were replaced in 1995. Off the living room is an enclosed porch. There is a full basement with access to property and garden area, one-car garage, plus a back porch with new studs etc. and new stairs to the ground. A new roof was installed in 2001.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 55-5-4
Address: 3460 Youngs Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Linda Bertani became the owner in 2001.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 55-5-5
Address: 3400 Youngs Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status:  Extant

Judith Berglund was owner in 2001.

Name: Windsong Craft Store (unoccupied as of 2012)
Tax ID Number: 55-5-9.1
Address: 46770 North Road
Hamlet: Southold
Date: 18th c.
Status: Extant

House is a full cape that dates to the 18th century and has exceptional interior woodwork.  It has been moved more than once.  Bill Smith and Hazel King were among the owners. Patricia Miloski was the owner in 2000.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 55-6-2
Address: 260 Yennecott Drive
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Owners: Zoumas Contracting.  Manfred Brusseler was the owner in 2000.

Name: Jeremiah Vail House
Tax ID Number: 56-3-5
Address: 59405 Main Street
Hamlet: Southold
Date: 1653
Status: Extant

Jeremiah Vail was the owner in 1653. John Booth was the owner circa 1850. Addy Astin was an owner. Erich Haesche was the owner in 2000.  This house is thought to contain the 17th century house given to the blacksmith Jeremiah Vail who was enticed to come to Southold from Southampton, as we had no blacksmith. It stood on Tuckers Lane on land formerly owned by John Budd. In the 1850s the house was purchased by John Booth for $100 and moved to its present location on the corner of Main Road and Laurel Avenue.  It is a Cape Cod house with ceilings about 7 ˝ feet high; the windows have 9 over 6 panes. The large fireplace, a copy of the original, has a built-in oven. There are four belly windows under the eaves (the position you assume in order to see out.). The west section of the house is mysteriously known as “Eel Pot.”  The present owner, a gas enthusiast and member of The Rushlight Club, has installed gas lighting in the birthing room, the room at the back west of the kitchen.  As of 1996 the Jeremiah Vail House is a Designated Landmark.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 56-4-17.1
Address: 63745 Main Road
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Owners: Therese Schwartz and David Haseltine.

Name: unknown
Tax ID Number: 56-5-26
Address: 325 Willow Point Road
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Owners: Judy Teeven and Thomas Maniuszko.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 59-2-5
Address: 9955 Soundview Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Owners: Joseph McCaffery, Richard Klein and Margaret McConnell.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 59-4-5.2
Address: 1540 Tucker Lane
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Owners: John D’Angelo and Katherine Fisher.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 59-5-4
Address: 2045 Lake Drive
Hamlet: Southold
Date:
Status: Extant

Owners: Priscilla Zimmer and Paul Mauro. In 2003 Lillian Hall became the owner.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 60-1-1
Address: 1975 Youngs Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date:  Before 1920
Status: Extant

The Butler Family owned this house in the early 1920s. Owen and Mildred Averette were the owners in the 1930s. Inez Meyers Kaelin was an owner. Ernest and Gen Maier were the owners from the 1950s to the 1970s. Mr. and Mrs. Maher were owners. Lynne Lambert was the owner in the 1980s and 1990s. Mary E. Kelly was the owner in 2000.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 60-1-2
Address: 1925 Youngs Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
before:  Before 1930
Status: Extant

Alice Salmon was an owner. Owen and Mildred Averette were the owners from the 1930s to the 1960s. Daniel Averette was the owner in the 1970s. David O. Averette became the owner in 2000.

Name: Unknown
Tax ID Number: 60-1-3
Address: 1865 Youngs Avenue
Hamlet: Southold
Date: before 1920
Status: Extant

Horton Point Lighthouse keeper Robert Ebbitts was the owner in the 1920s. John and Lil Kaelin were the owners in 1927. Dan and Lucille Jones rented the house in the 1990s. Barbara Celatka owned the house in 2000 as did John A. Clarke. In 2004 George Kokkinos became the owner.

Name: Lucretia Glover House
Tax ID Number: 60-1-4
Address: 1805 Youngs Avenue (Railroad Avenue)
Hamlet: Southold
Date:  Before 1811
Status: Extant

Lucretia (Prince) Glover was the owner from 1811 to 1901. Mary Purcell was the owner in 1918. Emily Purcell was the owner in 1945. Gilbert and May Miner were the owners in 1958.  May Miner wrote: “There was a (Mrs.) Lucretia Glover – an old lady – who lived in a house next to Long Island Produce on Railroad Avenue. Alvah Salmon used to love to see the Glovers every week. Lew (then in John Kaelin’s house on Railroad Avenue) at that time lived right next to (Mrs.) Lucretia Glover. Lucretia was much older than Alvah Salmon.”  There is a brick cellar under the main house with a brick floor and an early bath with a footed tub upstairs.

Name:  Abram F. Lowerre House
Tax ID Number:  61-1-3
Address:  260 Horton Lane
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  c.1860s-1870s
Status:  Extant

Abram Folk Lowerre (1844-1918) was a prominent local businessman who served on the board of the Southold Savings Bank.  He married Caroline Matilda Peck (1848-1926), one of the six Peck sisters, who were the daughters of wealthy nursery and racetrack owner, Israel Peck (1814-1881).  Lowerre was originally from Newtown, Queens, the son of Helen Rapelyea Folk (b. 1809) and Thomas Baldwin Lowerre (1806-1849), who operated a well know hotel in Newtown named "Lowerre's Hotel."  During the Civil War, Abram Lowerre served in the 47th New York State Militia. Between 1873 and 1874 he served as an officer (Second Assistant) of the Flushing Fire Department.  He married his wife in 1870 and by the late 1870s they were living in Southold.  In the early 1880s his older brother, Thomas B. Lowerre Jr. (1836-1892), was shot in the head and miraculously survived the wound.  In 1891 Abram Lowerre was elected as a director of the Southold Savings Bank, where he would later serve as assistant treasurer until his resignation due to ill health in 1914.  The house he and his wife occupied, located on the east side of Horton Lane, was probably built during the 1860s/70s (possibly for Lowerre), and is of a simplified Greek Revival style that was once very common across eastern Long Island.  For many years the house was occupied by the North Fork Parish Outreach thrift store, until its closure c. 2009-10 in the wake of a financial scandal.  The building itself has been owned for many years by George C. Stankevich of East Hampton, New York.  The building is currently (2012) in a state of disrepair.

Name:  Carpenter House
Tax ID Number:  61-3-2
Address:  52650 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  Unknown construction date
Status:  Extant

Name:  Brown-Clark House
Tax ID Number:  63-5-17
Address:  325 Horton Lane
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  Unknown construction date
Status:  Extant

Name:  Moses Conklin Cleveland-Charnews House
Tax ID Number:  63-6-8
Address:  52180 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date: c. 1832-34
Status:  Extant

Built before 1834 to the design of noted local architect and builder, William D. Cochran.  It is known that in the fall of 1834 Cochran and his apprentice, Richard Lathers of Georgetown, South Carolina, began construction of the fence in front of the house.  This same fence was demolished in 1902 by Cleveland's son, N. Hubbard Cleveland.  Deacon Moses Conklin Cleveland (1795-1883) was a long serving deacon in the Southold Presbyterian Church.  He made a notable boat trip with three other prominent businessman up to Niagara Falls in June of 1831,and his account is preserved in a journal held at the Suffolk County Historical Society in Riverhead.  During the middle of the 19th century, Cleveland served as one of the overseers of the poor.  He also served on the board of the Suffolk County Mutual Insurance Company and was one of the founding trustees of the Southold Savings Bank.  A portrait of Moses Cleveland painted by Sag Harbor artist Orlando Bears is held in the collection of the Southold Historical Society.  Following his death, his home passed to his son, N. Hubbard Cleveland, and later to the Charnews family.  The house, with its Doric columns, tracery sidelights, corner-board pilasters, and segmental-arched dormers, make it among the more elegant houses in Southold.  The current (2006) owner is Cement J. Charnews of Southold.

Name:  Conklin-Terry House
Tax ID Number:  70-1-2
Address:  51225 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  Unknown construction date
Status:  Extant

Name:  Cleveland-Gagen-Ichabod ? House
Tax ID Number:  70-1-5
Address:  50915 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  Unknown construction date
Status:  Extant

Name:  Burnett-Williams House
Tax ID Number:  70-1-9
Address:  50495 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  Unknown construction date
Status:  Extant

Name:  Craftsman Style House
Tax ID Number:  70-2-2
Address:  51470 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  Unknown construction date
Status:  Extant

Name:  Allen Tobey Carriage House (AKA L'Hommedieu Estate)
Tax ID Number:  70-6-20
Address:  3295 Pine Neck Road
Hamlet:  Southold
Date: c. 1910
Status:  Extant

Name:  Bayles-Tuthill-Corey House
Tax ID Number:  70-7-7.1
Address:  50705 Route 25
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  c. 1657-1667
Status:  Extant

Name:  Abidjah Corey House
Tax ID Number:  78-9-30.1
Address:  7365 Main Bayview Road
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  1726
Status:  Extant

Name:  Deacon James Horton House
Tax ID Number:  88-1-5
Address:  10585 Main Bayview Road
Hamlet:  Southold
Date:  1711
Status:  Extant
 

HISTORIC BUILDINGS - RESIDENTIAL - CUTCHOGUE

Name:  Buckingham-Case-Richmond House
Tax ID Number:  97-3-5
Address:  26960 Route 25
Hamlet:  Cutchogue
Date:  c. 1845
Status:  Extant

Name:  Benjamin M. Young House
Tax ID Number:  109-1-36
Address:  25425 Route 25
Hamlet:  Cutchogue
Date:  Before 1860
Status:  Extant

HISTORIC BUILDINGS - RESIDENTIAL - ORIENT

Name:  “The Early Wells House”
Tax ID Number: 13-3-4
Address: 1115 South View Drive (Brown's Hills)
Hamlet: Orient
Date:  1600s
Status: Extant (moved twice)

This house originally sat on the Wells Land Grant located at Tax Map Number 61-2-12.2 along its very western boundary.  Its first move was from there to Traveler Street in 1885 when Henry W. Prince needed a larger house.  His youngest child, Edith W. Prince, was born in the old house in 1882.  She remembered sleeping upstairs in the brick store (Henry W. Prince building) and spending her days in the barn while the new house was being built.  She was quite proud of the fact that she was the last child to be born in the old house (at least while it stood on its original site).  Its next move was in the 1960s to Browns Hills in Orient by Beva Eastman who still owns it (2000).

Name:  Capt. Marcus Brown House
Tax ID Number:  18-5-6
Address:  130 Village Lane
Hamlet:  Orient
Date:  Built in the early 1800s
Status:  Extant

Name:  Capt. Frederick King House
Tax ID Number:  24-2-15
Address:  1570 Village Lane
Hamlet:  Orient
Date:  Built before 1824
Status:  Extant

Name:  C. B. Havens House
Tax ID Number:  25-1-13
Address:  690 Village Lane
Hamlet:  Orient
Date:  Unknown construction date
Status:  Extant

Name:  Capt. George R. Vail House
Tax ID Number:  25-3-2.1
Address:  1495 Village Lane
Hamlet:  Orient
Date:  c. 1862
Status:  Extant
 

HISTORIC BUILDINGS - RESIDENTIAL - GREENPORT

Name  Unknown House
Tax Map Number: 34-04-03
Street Address: 1050 North Rd
Hamlet: Greenport
Built: 1750 (altered 1900)
Status:  Extant

Owners included Louis Leeb (c. 1961-62); Roland G. Levy.

Name:  Woodhull House
|Tax ID Number: 34-1-10
Street Address: 1215 Main Street,
Hamlet: Greenport
Date: c. 1920
Status:  Extant

Around 1920, owned by Christian Jenson.

More to Come!

 

 

Southold Historical Society

P.O. Box 1, Southold, NY 11971  /  631-765-5500 / Fax  631-765-8510    

Send mail to shsdirec@optonline.net with questions or comments about this web site. Copyright © 2003 Southold Historical Society   Last modified: 07/01/08

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